COVID-19 and the
Creative Industry
How coronavirus has affected the creative industry and steps
we can take to provide recovery actions.

It is no secret that industries across all fields are suffering from the coronavirus pandemic. Perhaps one of the most impacted is the creative industry. This group of creative workers often rely on live performances and in-person collaborations. Because of the nature of this virus, the arts industry cannot produce the services which support the industry without endangering the creative workers and the consumers. What was once an industry that created many jobs and revenue is now facing a devastating amount of unemployment and loss of wages. The creative industry must manage the challenges it currently faces during the pandemic, but also begin addressing a recovery plan for post-pandemic times. 

When the pandemic hit, the arts were incredibly affected. 2.7 million jobs have been lost and a horrifying amount of businesses directly related to the arts have had to close their doors permanently due to the lack of relief funding from the government and inability to offer goods and services during such a time. And though there has been some government relief, there has only been 40 million in aid from the CARES act. This doesn’t even begin to cover the 150 million dollars of lost wages for the creative industry. It is going to be more important than ever to look at upcoming plans for recovery efforts and advocate that the creative industry be heavily included in all policies. 

Arts and culture are crucial components of civic dialogue, and research shows that in the primary areas of concern for recovery—including racial justice, health, education, community cohesion, and public safety—the integration of creative workers improves outcomes and sets up the community for success

Americans for the Arts

In order to appropriately address the concerns of the creative economy, the new presidential executive branch needs to be advised by creative industry professionals. The arts should be integrated in a variety of industries to ensure success across all fields. There should also be a push for investments in creative careers so that companies and artists can get back on their feet. But knowing that finding spending money is a tricky and difficult task, we can be adjusting current relief policies to include the creative industry where they are currently not. Examples of this, listed by Americans for the Arts, include “incentivizing the training and hiring of veterans in creative fields by altering language in 38 U.S.C. § 3116; and amending the Small Business Act to more explicitly include creative businesses in its technical assistance and financial support programs” (Americans for the Arts). By adjusting these policies, it is giving the creative industry a chance at utilizing those already existing funds.

Looking forward, the United States is going to need the help from the creative industry to revitalize this nation. Americans for the Arts says in their article “To Rebuild and Reimagine the United State Post-Pandemic, We Must Put Creative Workers to Work”, “Arts and culture are crucial components of civic dialogue, and research shows that in the primary areas of concern for recovery—including racial justice, health, education, community cohesion, and public safety—the integration of creative workers improves outcomes and sets up the community for success” (American for the Arts). These workers can address a variety of issues within a community that will help rebuild the economy after such devastating loss. Coronavirus has done a serious number on all industries, especially the arts. But in order to recover as a nation, we should be putting a sincere focus on the creative industry so that creative workers can help contribute to the health, equity, and well-being of our communities which will rebuild our economy. 

 
Put Artists to
Work Proposal
Visit the full proposal by Americans for the Arts by clicking below.
Please consider endorsing this proposal at the same website once
you have read through it!
Go To Proposal

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